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The Tarot Cards of Tech: Helping you explore the impact of your products

By: Rob Girling
12/16/2019



We all want to design experiences people love. But we also want to create technology that leaves a positive mark on the world, and that takes more than just asking if a product is engaging and enjoyable. We also must ask: Are we designing products that support the world we all want to live in, today and tomorrow?


That’s why Artefact created The Tarot Cards of Tech: a free creative tool to inspire important conversations around the true impact of technology and the products we design. The Tarot Cards of Tech encourage you to think about the outcomes technology can create, from unintended consequences to opportunities for positive change. The cards are our way of helping you gaze into the future to determine how to make your product the best it can be.



The Tarot Cards of Tech help you think bigger picture and longer term about the products you create and their effect on the world. As an industry, we are waking up to ways in which the best intentions can lead to harmful outcomes. When you “move fast and break things,” well, things get broken – or worse. We can do better.

Visit The Tarot Cards of Tech website to download your free deck. Bring them to your next brainstorm or team meeting to start a conversation about questions of scale, of what usage really means, and how equity and access play a role in the technology we create. Perhaps the cards will help you expose a potential negative outcome that can be avoided, like a feature that could be abused or alienate people. The cards are also designed to help reveal opportunities to increase the positive aspects of technology, like ways to create more inclusive products or connect people in more meaningful ways. 


Now is the time to slow down and ask important questions of our work. It’s not only the right thing to do, it’s how we create better products and experiences.

This article was originally published by Artefact and has been republished here with permission.